Poem Wins Sakura Award in 2017 Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival International Haiku Invitational

Cherry Blossoms - Susanne Nilsson
Photo: Susanne Nilsson (Creative Commons/Flickr)

I was surprised and delighted to learn from a fellow haikuist that one of my poems recently received a Sakura Award in the 2017 Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival International Haiku Invitational.

My haiku was one of 15 by U.S. authors recognized with Sakura Awards in this year’s competition. In addition, a single poem was named Top Winner in the U.S. category, and another 25 U.S. poems were given Honourable Mentions.

Of the 41 U.S. poems granted awards, fully six – close to 15 percent – are by poets living and working in my home state of Ohio.

The theme of this year’s Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival Haiku Invitational was “freedom.” My poem speaks to the world of possibilities that await people of all ages and from all corners of the globe who seek to build their lives in freedom and peace:

an old man
learns two new words
cherry blossom

My heartfelt congratulations to the winning poets in all divisions of this year’s competition, and my sincere gratitude to the competition judges, Angelee Deodhar, Billie Wilson, and DeVar Dahl.

“Words and Music” Talk Launches National League of American Pen Women, Central Ohio Branch Guest Speaker Series

NLAPW talk 12 Sept 2017
Guest speaker Jennifer Hambrick with members of the Central Ohio Branch of the National League of American Pen Women, L to R: branch president Darlene Yeager-Torre, Hambrick, Mary Hoffman, Deborah Anderson, vice president Margaret Hanna and membership chair Rosalie Ungar.

I am greatly honored to have been invited to kick off the 2017-18 speaker series of the Central Ohio Branch of the National League of American Pen Women Tuesday evening. This amazing group of women artists put on a classy event at the Upper Arlington Public Library and could not have been more welcoming or more gracious.

Based in Washington, D.C., the National League of American Pen Women (NLAPW, or “Pen Women,” for short) is a venerable organization comprised of women artists in all mediums working throughout the U.S.

I was asked to talk about my multiple careers in music and letters, including my work as midday host and music director for WOSU Public Media’s Classical 101 radio station; my work writing about classical music for print, broadcast and online media; my career as a poet and my work as a performing singer.

For me, the highlights of the evening were meeting some of the chapter members in the “preception” before my talk, and having a chance to chat a bit more and enjoy some photo ops with them afterwards.

It was especially wonderful to see Mary Hoffman (pictured to my right in the photo above), one of my predecessors in my role as Classical 101 music director.  Mary was music director of WOSU Public Media’s classical music radio station when I was a teenager in Columbus and listening to that station every day.  Her work inspired me in innumerable ways, and I feel a special honor to carry her torch forward.

These talented and generous ladies sent me home with vase of gorgeous roses (!) and an invitation to join their group. But most importantly, they reminded me what a tremendous privilege it is to work in creative careers and to be inspired by the gifted artists who make Columbus’ vibrant arts scene what it is.

My thanks to branch president Darlene Yeager-Torre, Deborah Anderson and all of the members of the Central Ohio Branch of the National League of American Pen Women for the great honor to share my work and my story with you.

Newly Commissioned Poem Finds a Home

Jennifer Hambrick reads her commissioned poem at VIVO Music Festival Columbus Museum of Art
Poet Jennifer Hambrick reads her poem “on a cold sea we travel,” commissioned by the VIVO Music Festival, at the Columbus Museum of Art, Aug. 31, 2017.  Pictured L to R: VIVO Music Festival co-artistic director and violist John Stulz, violist Matthew Lipman, Jennifer Hambrick, VIVO Music Festival executive director Ted Ou-Yang. (Photo courtesy of VIVO Music Festival)

Last Thursday, I had the unique honor to read my poem “on a cold sea we travel,” commissioned by the VIVO Music Festival, as a preface to a performance of Arnold Schoenberg’s pivotal chamber music work Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night) in the festival’s concert “VIVO Transfigured” at the Columbus Museum of Art.

Receiving the commission to write the poem and having the opportunity to read it aloud in a resplendent venue were incredibly special. But beyond that? I tend to think of my poems as my children and, like any good literary parent, to want them to thrive and eventually settle down in the pages of a nice literary journal. So I found myself wondering, what next? for this poem, which was invited and welcomed so warmly into the world.

I am delighted that “on a cold sea we travel” has been accepted for publication in the fabulous literary journal The Main Street Rag, where it will eventually take up residence among poems by other serious writers. My poem has found a home. A good one.

And now I can’t help but dream that “on a cold sea we travel” might be read aloud as the preface to other performances of Verklärte Nacht, once the poem has been published.

My undying thanks to VIVO Music Festival co-artistic directors John Stulz and Siwoo Kim for coming up with the brilliant idea to ask a poet to transfigure Transfigured Night. I’m humbled that they chose me for the task. They share top billing for the success of “on a cold sea we travel.”

Newly Commissioned Poem Transfigures Arnold Schoenberg’s Pivotal Chamber Music Work “Transfigured Night”

VIVO photo Derby Court CMA
VIVO Music Festival 2016 at the Columbus Museum of Art, Derby Court (Photo: Courtesy of the VIVO Music Festival)

I am greatly honored to have received a commission from the VIVO Music Festival to write a poem in response to Arnold Schoenberg’s pivotal string sextet Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), and to present my new poem in its world-premiere reading Thursday evening at the Columbus Museum of Art.

Under the creative leadership of its founders and co-artistic directors Siwoo Kim and John Stulz, the VIVO Music Festival brings world-class musicians to Columbus, Ohio, for one week each summer for performances of great chamber music repertory in venues all around the city. In its third season, the 2017 festival will feature Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht Thurs., Aug. 31 at 7 p.m. in the Columbus Museum of Art’s Derby Court.

In keeping with the theme of Thursday’s concert – “VIVO Transfigured” – Stulz asked me to write a poem that would respond to Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht and also update the poem of the same title by German poet Richard Dehmel that inspired Schoenberg’s work – in short, to transfigure Transfigured Night.

The task of composing my new poem was exciting and daunting. Delving into and gleaning inspiration from the rich philosophical and cultural contexts in which Dehmel and Schoenberg worked was exhilarating. At the same time, in fulfilling the commission, I was fully aware that my new poem would become, if only in a small way, still nothing less than a part of the history of Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht.

I will present my new poem “on a cold sea we travel” in its world-premiere reading at Thursday’s concert, as an introduction to the musicians’ performance of Schoenberg’s work. The reading and the performance will be live streamed on Facebook.

My hope is that, when heard before Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht, “on a cold sea we travel” will set the stage for experiencing the philosophical and sonic richness of Schoenberg’s music in a uniquely musical way. I took the idea of traveling on a cold sea as much from my experience of hearing Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht, with its dramatic waves of sound in continuous ebb and flow, as from the particular line in Dehmel’s poem that the title of my poem paraphrases. In an effort to preserve the essential philosophical resonances of Dehmel’s poem, in “on a cold sea we travel” I have aimed to convey an apotheosis that is truly universal – shared by poet and all who experience the poem. I’ve also conceived the surface music of the poem – the alliteration, assonance, and rhythms of the words – to serve as a special kind of gateway into listeners’ experience of Schoenberg’s work.

My extreme gratitude to John Stulz, Siwoo Kim, and the VIVO Music Festival for this singular honor, and to the Ohio Arts Council for funding in support of the commission.

Haiga Wins “Haiku Master of the Week” Honor from Japan’s NHK WORLD TV

Jennifer Hambrick - alone
Photo and poem © Jennifer Hambrick. All rights reserved.

A couple of weeks ago, I created my very first haiga – haiku plus visual art in symbiotic relationship. Today, it became a media celebrity.

This morning, I was named Haiku Master of the Week on the NHK WORLD TV (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) series Haiku Masters for my haiga “alone,” shown above. You can watch the mini-episode of Haiku Masters which aired on NHK TV this morning at this link.

Two of the hosts and judges of Haiku Masters wrote some thoughtful comments about my haiga, which was selected in a process of blind judging.

“One of the most important points of this piece is how although the narrator may be looking outside, he or see seems to be more focused on an inner dialogue. […] Furthermore, the word placement on the photo is wonderful, as isolating the word ‘alone’ increases the sentiment of loneliness,” wrote Japanese haiku poet Kazuko Nishimura.

“What exactly is the space between raindrops, we wonder, and imagine what thoughts slip in between,” wrote the American-born poet and photographer Kit Pancoast Nagamura. Read the judges’ full comments here.

I wish to congratulate this week’s runners-up – Joelle Ginoux-Duvivier (France) and Kanchan Chatterjee (India) and to thank Ms. Nishimura and Ms. Pancoast Nagamura for seeing something meaningful in my work amidst a pool of thousands of submissions worldwide. I am delighted and humbled by this honor.

Poetry Radio Program Wins International Award

cover
Photo: Jennifer Hambrick

Doing something you love is its own reward. But that reward is always sweeter when others recognize the value of your contribution.

I was notified recently that a poetry reading and roundtable conversation radio program I produced and hosted in April 2016 received an Honorable Mention in the 2016 International Association of Audio Information Services (IAAIS) Awards. This project combined two things I love: the power of poetry to move and inspire, and the power of radio to reach people where and when they least expect it.

For the program, which I produced for broadcast on the “Morning Exchange” program on VOICEcorps, the audio reading service for the vision impaired community in Columbus, Ohio, I invited three other poets from around Ohio to share a few of their poems and talk about how they were bitten by the poetry bug. I and fellow Ohio poets Sayuri Ayers, Mark Sebastian Jordan and Kathleen Burgess recorded the one-hour program at the VOICEcorps studios for broadcast during April 2016 – National Poetry Month.

Here is the audio (unedited) of the April 2016 poetry program.  I am grateful to Sayuri, Mark and Kathleen for granting me permission to share their poetry on this platform.

The Making of a Haiku Collection

deskwithhaikumanuscript-resized-edited
My desk, with haiku book manuscript in the center  (Photo: Jennifer Hambrick)

Some of you have asked when I will be compiling a full-length collection of haiku for publication. I have decided that the time is now. Imagine: a big book of little poems.

I pulled together into a Word document all of my haiku, published and otherwise, that are strong contenders for membership in a full-length collection.  That’s the stack of papers in the center of the ginormous desk – which I inherited from a dear friend when she downsized her dwelling a few years ago – in my poetry studio, shown in the photo above.

I then cut the document so that each poem would occupy its own little piece of paper.  Here is the resulting heap o’ ku:

pileofku-edited
My haiku book manuscript in bits and pieces. (Photo: Jennifer Hambrick)

Then I laid each of the poem “pieces” on my desk and moved them around, noting the themes that emerged.  I gave each theme a “name,” which will become the headings for each section of the book.  Here is the “draft” of my entire haiku collection, all laid out poem by poem, and with section headings written on yellow Post-It Notes:

haikumanuscriptdraft-edited
A ‘draft’ of my haiku collection. (Photo: Jennifer Hambrick)

Once I’ve slid and scooted the poems into a satisfying order, the fun and games will end.  On the rest of the book publication journey, I will submit the manuscript, wait for acceptance, and eventually, at the advice of the formidable editor I am asking the Universe to send to curate my poems, likely murder at least some of my proverbial darlings.

Ah, the romance of poetry.

But in the end, there will be a book of poems that, I hope, will bring some reader somewhere feelings of wonder, joy, connection, and hope.

Poem Receives Award in Montenegrin International Haiku Competition

Andrey photo of Ulcinj, Montenegro
Photo: Andrey (Creative Commons/Flickr)

It was announced recently that one of my haiku received a merit award in the first Montenegrin Haiku Festival Competition – Nature in My Eye.

My poem was one of 20 haiku named among the winners in the competition, in which 167 authors from 31 countries entered a total of 835 poems.  I am honored and humbled to be in the company of some great haikuists, whose work I look forward to reading in the festival anthology.

The festival will take place August 25-27 in beautiful Montenegro.

Congratulations to all of the winners, and my sincere gratitude to the contest judges.

Celebrating ‘The Cherita’ with a New Poetry Journal

The Cherita inaugural issue cover
Cover of the inaugural issue of The Cherita (June 2017)

It’s always exciting to get in on the ground of floor of a new enterprise.  Today, one of my poems did just that.

I am thrilled and humbled that one of my poems was published today in the inaugural issue of the international poetry journal The Cherita.

The Malayan poet ai li created the poetic form of the cherita in 1997.  The word “cherita” means “story” in Malay.  ai li’s three-line cherita form encourages the telling of tales in deft, imagistic language that guides the reader through narratives that gain momentum with each stanza.

This month, the cherita form turns 20, and to celebrate, it gets its own journal, co-edited by ai li and American poet Larry Kimmel.  The inaugural issue showcases each cherita on its own page, and illustrates each poem with a vivid photograph related to the poem’s story.  The final product is a feast of written and visual images.

View here the beautiful flipbook of the inaugural issue of The Cherita.

ai li and Larry Kimmel have selected a number of my cheritas for publication in the next several issues of their journal.  I am honored, and I’m eager to read more moving and inspiring stories in the issues to come.

Hot Honeymoon Haiku Published in The Asahi Shimbun

Doug Kerr Charleston photo Creative Comons Flickr
Charleston, South Carolina.  Photo: Doug Kerr (Creative Commons/Flickr)

We were happy. And at the same time, we were wrecked.

Fifteen years ago, my then brand-new husband and I were walking around beautiful Charleston, South Carolina, on our honeymoon hot and wilted. All the hype and hoopla of our wedding the day before had taken the starch out of us, so we just thought we were dragging from plain old exhaustion.

But we learned later that day the we had actually been walking around Charleston in 104-degree heat.  And, given that this was June in Charleston, heaven only knows what the humidity was.

But though we were wrecked, we were happy.

So, on June 2, the fifteenth anniversary of that sweltering day, it was a delight to see my haiku inspired by our honeymoon published in Japan’s leading daily newspaper, The Asahi Shimbun, in a special column devoted to honeymoons.  My sincere thanks to editor David McMurray.  Here is my haiku:

Hambrick preacher's pulpit haiku